Wildflowers Don’t Read Books

I have been having lots of fun this summer getting to know the various wildflowers that grow around Thorpe Cloud and the River Dove, and identifying those previously unfamiliar to me from photographs. (See my earlier post on Wildflower Surveying.) Now that the school holidays over, I am finally able to sort out all the information I have scribbled, photos I have taken, and try to make sense of it. However I am constantly amused by the flowers that don’t read the guidebooks.

Of the various ‘Indicator Species’ that I need to record,

  • Wood sage was not found in my patch of woodland, but growing happily on the rocky cliff.
  • Wild Marjoram was not found in the sunny grassland, but in the woods.
  • Quaking grass grows not in either place, but by the stream.
  • Bedstraws grow everywhere, but almost never the species I am checking for.
  • A friend tried to identify a sedge for me that, if correct, isn’t supposed to grow anywhere near here. (I might leave that one to recheck next year since there are only one or two!)

I am also amazed at just how many different species of plant grow in some habitats – to identify everything along my 25m of stream, or 25m2 of grassland would take me most of a day each, if I was to look at everything with magnifying glass and book(s) in hand. Luckily I don’t have to, as a list of habitat-specific plants has been drawn up that will indicate how healthy and happy it is over time, and checking for those can, thankfully, be done within the time I have available. However when it comes to the river, I can actually do all the plants – there are only six in the water, of which only two species (water mint and river crowfoot) are actually on the list.

Eyebright (Euphrasia sp.) – a solitary flower in June became a whole carpet by August.

Here are a few favourites from Thorpe Cloud, which definitely don’t grow wild around where I live. Some are within my survey area, others were photographed higher up on the hill.

Close-up of Thyme-leaved Sandwort (Arenaria serpyllifolia)

It may seem obvious when enlarged like this, but counting petals is critical! So many of these flowers are only 2-3mm across and look very similar at first glance, especially as their leaves can be mixed with other plants. Even plants like Dove’s-foot Crane’s-bill grow tiny up here – a thin covering of soil over rock, and being regularly grazed by rabbits means that very little gets to any great size.

It is fortunate that the ground is very steep, bringing the plants close to eye-level, or else I would spend all my time crouching over!

Biting Stonecrop (Sedum acre), Thyme-leaved Sandwort (Arenaria serpyllifolia), and Dove’s-foot Crane’s-bill (Geranium molle) growing together.

Thyme (Thymus polytrichus ssp britannicus) and Limestone Bedstraw (Galium sterneri) are fairly abundant in the area.

Field Madder (Sherardia arvensis), a close relative of the bedstraws.

Common Stork’s-bill (Erodium cicutarium)