Flowers and Weeds – Part 1

My garden has, like any garden, evolved over the years as it has developed and I have learned what suits the conditions. The basic layout I created soon after we moved here (sixteen years ago) remains in place today, a semi-wild cottage style garden, with flowers, vegetables and fruit, surrounded by hedgerows. However my plant choices have changed to being mostly native and mostly edible, and preferably able to look after themselves. Overall the garden is not very large, but remains open to the views (and the weather!) to the North giving an airy, spacious feel.

Cherry tree 'Stella'

Cherry tree ‘Stella’

In recent years for various reasons my time and energies have been rather unpredictable, leading to much relaxation of my gardening expectations and working with nature as far as possible. M has now reached the stage of being able to walk with shoes on, so this year I am making a special effort to do child-friendly gardening. Little bits at a time, with relatively instant and reliable results, in gardening terms anyway.

Flowers have been my focus this week. After having spent three weeks semi-weeding*, clearing and composting, a plant catalogue arrived serendipitously in the post, its pages filled with tempting colourful perennials all ready to plant out and provide instant beauty. In previous years I have grown flowers from seed, but windowsill peppers and tomatoes are enough of a challenge for M to keep intact, so this looked a great idea to me. However, past experience also suggests that many of the glossy photos feature plants designed for the warmer climes Down South, preferably with well-drained, humus-rich soil, and regular feeding and watering. They are the sort of plants that are easy to propagate and grow really well in potting compost, flowering all summer in sheltered conditions, but tend to fare very badly in my exposed, heavy clay garden, rarely surviving their first winter. So I decided to make a list of all the plants I thought I might like in the garden and didn’t already have, and then get out my trusty pendulum (a haematite necklace being my favourite for this purpose) to dowse for which plants would actually enjoy growing here. Out went the penstemons, fuchsias, osteospermums, coreopsis, pinks, lobelias, day lilies, echinaceas and verbenas. It is a great way to save money! My list was rapidly reduced to one of more manageable proportions, and I have now put my order in for some hardy geraniums, campanulas, platycodons, papavers and anemones with every expectation of them being a success.

Corner of garden

Corner of garden

Knowing what plants already grow well here, and what doesn’t, I will admit that I didn’t get many surprises with my dowsing on this occasion. However, I will also receive some free pelargoniums with my order, not a plant I have been particularly inspired by before, but which my dowsing suggests will do better than any other bedding plant in the dry and sun-baked pots directly outside my South-facing front door. (Diascias are the only thing I have had any great success with so far.) I look forward to them flowering and welcoming visitors all summer long as promised…

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*Semi-weeding is a term I have created to cover what I do in my garden, keeping a balance between it looking ‘weedy’ and being too neat and tidy. This can be very hard to explain to adult garden ‘helpers’!

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